No one will ever tell you the world is getting any easier or less complicated. However as technology, pace and pressures close in, there is a growing movement to push back, and get back to basics. And many are embracing it. Here’s how you can too.

 

Take it slower

Doing less, not trying to cram, enjoying your downtime and easing back from responsibilities can work wonders. When you consider that those that move slower often make fewer large errors, are more aware of themselves and others emotionally and are generally more relaxed and content, shouldn’t you give it a try?

 

Declutter your world

Next time you’re watching the hugely popular Marie Kondo or that latest episode of ‘Hoarders’, consider this. Separating yourself from physical and mental clutter can allow you to become less stressed and anxious, sleep better, become more creative and productive, save money and benefit your health. So don’t knock it until you try it!

 

Don’t sweat the small stuff

There’s nothing wrong with trying hard to impress, achieve and get those finer details right. However for those super-perfectionists out there, consider this. Vilfredo Pareto, an Italian Philosopher and Microeconomist discovered the beginnings of the 80/20 theory back in 1896. This was later refined to state that 80% of the results we achieve in a particular area may come from just 20% of our efforts, in other words, trying too hard can often be highly ineffective.

 

Less is more

When you step back and assess what you have in life, many things are those we really don’t need. Possessions can become complicators and the things you own can wind up owning you. By ensuring everything in your life has a reason to be there and gives you something back, you will discover a lot that doesn’t. If that’s the case, remove it.

 

 

The power of fewer choices

Having less choice and fewer decisions to make can be liberating. When you have too many options, it can be overwhelming to the point of not being able to act. Consider streamlining your choices. If you subscribe to 25 blogs, consider – will another really be worthwhile or useful? If you’re looking at ties or scarves in a wardrobe, is considering 30 separate items a help or a hinderance? Put yourself in positions where you have fewer, simpler decisions to make, and you’ll be happier because of it.

 

 

Multi-tasking, who needs it?

Multi-tasking can often mean you do lots of things at once, but not as well as you would if each one had your full attention. Loading yourself up on tasks and duties simultaneously can also mean that while you finish some things, others will constantly remain unfinished, or your mind will drift to what’s next. Leave multi-tasking to talented jugglers. Instead consider spending time focused on quality, not quantity.

 

Saying no

Often simplification takes just one word – “No.” When you learn to stop accepting a multitude of invites, commitments and tasks, you experience greater freedom and time for what is important exclusively to you, not others. It can take bravery, but adding a ‘thank you’ and being polite when saying no can help.

 

Unplug

With the intrusion of calls, emails, texts, updates, alerts and other intrusions, there can be a real power in placing your phone, tablet or laptop away, even just for a short while. A digital detox will restore the balance in your life, and potentially improve your personal well-being and relationships. Slide devices into drawers, leave them on desks or simply get out and into places where technology use can be minimised.

 

 

Above are just some of the ways you can simplify and streamline your life for the better. Hopefully our hints and tips have inspired. Let’s face it, no one can live in a cave forever, and many of the complexities we face in life are unavoidable, but we hope you’ve found these hints and tips helpful. We wish you well on your simplicity quest!

 

The following advice is of a general nature only and intended as a broad guide. The advice should not be regarded as legal, financial or real estate advice. You should make your own inquiries and obtain independent professional advice tailored to your specific circumstances before making any legal, financial or real estate decisions. Click here for full Terms of Use.